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STUDENTS ON ICE  | 12, ch Fosbery |  Chelsea, Quebec, Canada | 866-336-6423



I'm taking the One-Tonne challenge. Are you?

Meet our 2005 Expedition/Education Team

Dr. Fred Roots
GEOFF GREEN (Expedition Leader)

INGRID BAJEWSKY
DAVID BROCK
HARRY "SKID" CREASE
ALISON FREEMAN
LISA "DIZ" GLITHERO
Dr. DAVID R. GRAY
Dr. PETER JOHNSON
DR. ROY "FRITZ" KOERNER
DR. ERIC MATTSON
ELIZABETH “BETS” MCNIE
VERONIQUE MORIN
DAVE MUSSELL
SCOBIE PYE
DR. FRED ROOTS
RICHARD SEARS
JOHN STREICKER
JUSTIN P.J. TRUDEAU
Dr. DON WALSH
SHEILA WATT-CLOUTIER

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INGRID BAJEWSKY
Geography and Geology Teacher at Nipissing University

Ingrid Bajewsky currently teaches physical geography and geology courses in the Geography/Geology Department at Nipissing University. She has taught a variety of courses including general geology, natural hazards, geomorphology, and paleoclimatology and climate change. Her research interests however, lie specifically in the area of glacial hydrology, with a particular interest in rock glaciers. She has conducted glaciological research in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and the Saint Elias Mountains in Yukon Territory. Ms. Bajewsky's commitment to helping university students attain their goals led her into also team-teaching a unique course at the university entitled University Success. She holds a Bachelor and Masters degree in Physical Geography, and a Bachelor of Education. During her career Ms. Bajewsky has also held positions as an environmental consultant and a substitute teacher.
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DAVID BROCK
Circumpolar Consulting

David Brock is the proud son of two pioneering families from Gravenhurst, Ontario. Currently, David lives in Ottawa where he operates his business Circumpolar Consulting, which advises northern institutions on public policy and intergovernmental relations. He holds degrees from Dalhousie University and the University of Saskatchewan. In 2005, David will begin a doctorate in political science at the University of Western Ontario, in connection with ArcticNet. In addition, David has been selected for a 2005-2006 Action Canada Public Policy Fellowship. David sits on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Political Science Association, and is a member of the national mentoring organization Bouge Canada. David enjoys kayaking, basketball and tennis, and is an avid traveller.
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HARRY "SKID" CREASE
Outdoor Environmental Educator

Beginning his teaching career in 1968, Skid specialized in out of classroom "quest" experiences with his students. Such quest experiences included trips to Greece, Spain, N. Africa, the N.W.T. and numerous canoe, ski, snowshoe, backpacking, and climbing adventure programs around Ontario. In 1986, he served for ten years as the Program Leader/Site Manager in Outdoor Education at Mono Cliffs and Bolton Outdoor Education Centres for North York and Toronto District School Board. Skid served a three year secondment, from 1998 to 2001, as Professor and Environment Science Advisor at the Faculty of Education, York University. Skid is currently President of ECONEXUS, and Director of Outdoor Experiences for the Earth Rangers Foundation.

In 1990, Skid was selected as one of twenty-five Canadian educators who traveled to Costa Rica to advise the International Development Research Council (IDRC) on the suitability of North-South global education teacher institutes between Costa Rica and Canada. In 1993, he was honoured with the OSEE Canada Award for "excellence in teaching, active leadership, and scholarly endeavour in the field of environmental education." The next year Annick Press published his first children's story, In the Great Meadow. In 1995, he received the Provincial Leadership Award from the Ontario Teachers Federation Global Education Program. In 1999, he was selected to be a member of the Global Climate change Institute program in Aspen, Colorado. In 2000, Skid was awarded by COEO for his "outstanding contributions in the promotion and development of Outdoor Education programmes in Ontario." He is an internationally respected educator, author, storyteller, keynote speaker, workshop leader, and chair for global, environmental, and outdoor education conferences.
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ALLISON FREEMAN
Green Street

In 1999, I participated in an exchange with Canada World Youth between BC/Indonesia and the Philippines. The exchange opened my eyes to recognize the tremendous value of experiential education. I then pursued environmental studies and food systems at the universities of Guelph, UBC and Uppsala, Sweden. For the past 2 years, I've been working with Learning for a Sustainable Future (LSF) on a project called Green Street. I help to coordinate opportunities within the Canadian school system that actively engage students and educators in environmental learning and sustainability education. We aim to deliver programs that are relevant to students' concerns, curriculum-linked, encourage a sense of personal responsibility for the environment, foster a commitment to sustainable living, and promote an enduring dedication to environmental stewardship.
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LISA "DIZ" GLITHERO
Environmental Educator, SOI Program Coordinator, Director of the EYES Project

Diz GlitheroDiz Glithero is a committed educator who has spent the majority of her young life pursuing unique educational experiences immersed in the natural world. Her experiences include: teaching English in the Himalayan village of Chhomrong; teaching grade 4 in the Heiltsuk community of Bella Bella on the northwest coast of BC; teaching integrated high school environmental leadership programs; and leading 30 day environmental education-based kayak expeditions in Labrador for high school/university students. Diz's passion lies in fostering a more socio-ecological consciousness in today's youth. Most recently Diz has just completed a Master in Education degree at Queen's University while working for the Outdoor Experiential Education program at the faculty. She is now working as the program coordinator for Students on Ice and is spearheading the EYES Project-an initiative to build public awareness for the need to bring more environmental and sustainable education ideologies into mainstream schooling policy and practice.
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Dr. DAVID R. GRAY
Arctic Biologist and Historian

An arctic biologist and historian, David Gray has studied birds and mammals in Canada's High Arctic since 1968. Formerly a research scientist with the Canadian Museum of Nature (CMN), he has made over 30 research trips to the arctic islands, studying the behaviour of musk oxen, arctic hare, and red-throated loons. As an independent researcher since 1994, he has prepared reports on Peary caribou, arctic wolves, the cultural and natural resources of three northern national parks, and the historic places of Nunavut.

He has written two books on arctic subjects (The Muskoxen of Polar Bear Pass and Alert: Beyond the Inuit Lands) and completed a Virtual Museum of Canada exhibit on the Canadian Arctic Expedition of 1913-1918. David worked on a number of arctic films and museum exhibits for CMN, and is a Research Associate at both CMC and CMN. David has travelled to several arctic communities to interview Elders in relation to his research on arctic wildlife and history. He is at present working on a virtual museum exhibit on the Arctic Hare.
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GEOFF GREEN
Adventure Educator, Expedition Leader, Founder of Students on Ice

Geoff GreenThirty-eight year old Canadian adventurer and educator Geoff Green has been leading expeditions from pole to pole for the past decade. Many notable organizations such as the Discovery Channel, World Wildlife Fund, National Audubon and the Smithsonian Institution enlist Geoff to lead their groups into the world's most remote and exciting regions. In 2004, Outpost Magazine named Geoff one of the "top six Canadian Explorers" to watch.

As an expedition leader, he is a veteran of 64 Antarctic expeditions and 24 Arctic expeditions. He has been spotted in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea, on horseback in Patagonia, on the shores of Pitcairn Island, and in the rainforests of Madagascar. A former school teacher, Geoff has skippered yachts; taught skiing in the Swiss Alps; was the first person to water-ski in both the Polar Regions; has been three times through the Northwest Passage; and led the largest ever expedition to Antarctica during the Millennium. A fan of Sir Ernest Shackleton, Geoff has retraced parts of the Endurance journey six times, including in 1998 when he led the retracing expedition together with several descendants of Shackleton's crew.

When not leading expeditions, Geoff shares his experiences and perspectives by speaking at schools, conferences and special events around the world. He has recently been a guest speaker at the Royal Geographical Society in London, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, and the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

Geoff and his expeditions have been featured extensively in international media, as well as in numerous documentaries. Geoff is a Fellow of The Explorer's Club, and regularly advises on conservation, film and expedition related projects around the world. In 2003, Geoff and Students on Ice received the prestigious Michael J. Smith Award for making an outstanding contribution to the promotion of science, through activities encouraging popular interest in science or developing science abilities in Canada.
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Dr. PETER JOHNSON
Professor of Physical Geography, University of Ottawa

Peter Johnson is a Professor of Physical Geography at the University of Ottawa where he has specialised in Arctic regions for 35 years. His research has focused on glaciated mountain regions, primarily the southwest Yukon, working on glacial geomorphology, glacier and mountain hydrology, and environmental change. He has promoted the importance of the field experience in geographical and environmental research through field courses in the Kluane Region of Yukon for over 30 years. Outside the university world he has worked extensively in the promotion of northern research emphasising the need for research in the north, for the north and by northerners. Working with an association of universities with research in the north for most of his career, serving four years as president, and with the Canadian Polar Commission as Vice-Chair and Chair the promotion of polar research both nationally and internationally has been a priority. In the circum-arctic world he has represented Canada on the International Arctic Science Committee, the University of the Arctic Council, and the Northern Research Forum. His current focus is on the participation of Canada in the International Polar Year 2007 - 2008
emphasising the "human dimension" of polar research.
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DR. ROY "FRITZ" KOERNER
Renowned glaciologist and recipient of two Polar Medals for his work in both Antarctica and the Arctic

He is an emeritus scientist at the National Glaciology Program of the Geological Survey of Canada. In 1968-69, Fritz was a member of the remarkable British Trans-Arctic Expedition. A four-party group that crossed the Arctic Ocean sea ice from Barrow, Alaska to Svalbard, Spitzbergen via the North Pole. Perhaps one of the greatest polar expeditions of all time. This is Fritz's 5th expedition with Students on Ice!
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DR. ERIC MATTSON
Chair of the Geography/Geology Department at Nipissing University, Director of the Nipissing Environmental Research Centre and an Adjunct Professor with the Cold Regions Research Centre at Wilfrid Laurier University.

Eric Mattson has been conducting glaciological research for the past 20 years. Most of his research has been conducted on glaciers in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, the Saint Elias Mountains in Yukon Territory, and the Himalayan Mountain Range. Dr. Mattson's main research interest revolves around energy balance studies (small scale and large scale), and research into variations in glacier volume to determine past, present and future trends in glacier size and melt water production. Other research involvements include snowmelt modeling in North-eastern Ontario, debris flow activity in Banff National Park, and island biogeography in Massasauga Provincial Park.
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ELIZABETH "BETS" MCNIE
Doctoral Research, Environmental Studies

Elizabeth 'Bets' McNie is a doctoral candidate at the University of Colorado at Boulder in Environmental Studies. Her primary area of research is science and technology policy, with an emphasis on climate change science and how it can be used more effectively to improve natural resource management. She is also part of an interdisciplinary fellowship called 'Carbon, Climate and Society' that is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. She recently participated in research in Iceland in which she investigated Iceland's paleo-climate and how it adapted to past climate variability. Other research interests include renewable energy, ocean policy, policy research, and interdisciplinary teaching.

Prior to returning to graduate school, Elizabeth sailed as an officer in the United States Merchant Marine on a variety of ships including container ships, oil tankers, training vessels, and offshore oil-drilling rigs. She also taught at the California Maritime Academy where she held a variety of positions including lecturer, watch officer, ship's navigator, and the professional development and leadership training officer. She taught several classes, among them, celestial navigation, ship-handling and shipboard operations. A long time ago, Elizabeth lived and worked in Alaska where she worked as a commercial fisherman and fishmonger.
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VERONIQUE MORIN
Journalist, Radio Host, News Anchor

Véronique Morin is a journalist, radio host, and news anchor with 98,5fm in Montreal and believes strongly that Science should have an important place in a daily newscast.

She has 20 years experience as a journalist. She was science reporter and co-host of Panorama on Ontario's public network and has filed more than one hundred current affairs reports on Science, the environment and technologies for television. Her documentary on Hubert Reeves was nominated at the "Festival international des films scientifiques" in 1994.

Véronique Morin was elected president of the Canadian Science Writers' Association (CSWA) in 2001 and re-elected in 2003 for a second two-year term, which ended in June of 2005. She was elected the first president of the World Federation of Science Journalists (WFSJ) at its' founding meeting Brazil in November 2002. She also served as a judge for Industry Canada's Science Culture Canada programme between 93-95.
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DAVE MUSSELL
Environmental Educator, Pembina Institute

Dave Mussell is a biologist, educator, and curriculum designer specializing in science and the environment. He has served as the Pembina Institute's lead educational developer and presenter for the past 11 years. Dave received his first post-secondary degree in the field of wildlife ecology, and later became a certified teacher in the province of Alberta. He is the senior author of the nationally acclaimed Climate Change Awareness and Action education kit, and the Re-energy.ca web site, an on-line renewable energy project kit. Dave has a burning passion for understanding and interpreting the natural world, and for learning how to live within the ecological limits of local environments. He has become well known for his skill in guiding people to a deeper appreciation of nature and in the practical aspects of sustainable living. When not leading workshops or writing, Dave can usually found in his organic garden or bee yard, in the woodworking shop making African hand drums, experimenting with renewable energy systems, or out paddling the rivers and lakes, or on the trails in the mountains and foothills near his home. Dave lives with his family (wife, three teen-aged kids) on an acreage near the town of Drayton Valley, Alberta.
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SCOBIE PYE
Antarctic Scientist and Historian

Scobie Pye is a research scientist with a Master of Science degree awarded by the University of Tasmania, Australia. Over the past 30 years much of his life has been spent in southern latitudes working with the British Antarctic Survey (B.A.S.), the Australian Antarctic Division and the University of Tasmania. He has spent four winters and seven summers on the Sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, two summers on the floating ice shelf station of Halley Bay in the Weddell Sea and two winters and nine summers on Australia's Macquarie Island. Scobie's main scientific interests are focused on the conservation and management of the Sub-Antarctic Islands, the impact of introduced mammals on these fragile ecosystems, sustainable tourism in the Antarctic and conservation of the region. In 1978, Scobie was awarded the Fuchs Medal for outstanding service to the British Antarctic Survey.
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DR. FRED ROOTS
Expert in Polar issues and Science Advisor Emeritus to Environment Canada

Dr. Roots is Science Advisor Emeritus to Environment Canada. He graduated in geological engineering at the University of British Columbia, and received his Ph.D. in geology from Princeton University. He was senior geologist in the first international scientific study of Antarctica, the Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1949-52: co-leader of Operation Franklin, the major study that established the petroleum potential of the Canadian arctic Islands in 1955; and leader of Operation Stikine 1956 and 1958, the first integrated geological study of the Canadian northern Cordillera. In 1958 he organized the Polar Continental Shelf Project and served as its coordinator until 1971. From 1968 he became involved in discussions of the environmental responsibilities of the Canadian government, which led to the organization of the Department of the Environment. In 1971 he was appointed Advisor, Environmental and Northern Programmes, Department of the Energy Mines and Resources, and in 1973 he became Science Advisor to the Department of the Environment, and served in that capacity until becoming Science Advisor Emeritus in 1989.

Dr. Roots has been active in a number of international and non-governmental scientific and environmental activities and researchers. He was a member of the Polar Research Board of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences 1970-83 and subsequently on several of its technical committees. From 1979 to 1983 he was President of the International Commission on Snow and ice, served on the Science Advisory Board of the Geophysical Institute University of Alaska 1976-88 (Chairman 1980-84). He was a founder of the International Arctic Science Committee and served as its first President (1991-94) and since 1983 has been chairman of the Northern Sciences Network of the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Programme. He is author of over 250 scientific papers and published reports on Polar, environmental, and global change subjects. Dr. Roots has a mountain range in Antarctic named after him. His many awards include the Gold medal from the Royal Geographical Society.
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RICHARD SEARS
Whale Researcher and Expert

Richard Sears is founder and president of Mingan Island Cetacean Study a research project dedicated to ecological studies of marine mammals. He
established the first long-term studies of Blue whales both in the North
Atlantic and in the northeast Pacific Oceans. He has studied Blue whales in
eastern Canada, Iceland, West Greenland, the Azores, the Antarctic, and in
the Sea of Cortez , Mexico. In 2002 his research led to the recognition of
"endangered status" for the Blue whale in Canadian waters.
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JOHN STREICKER
Northern Climate Exchange

John heads up the Northern Climate ExChange, whose mission is to provide a credible independent source of information, develop shared understanding and promote action on climate change in northern Canada. The North is on the front-line of climate change and John has responded by throwing his thoughts and energy at the problem.

For the past 15 years John has been working around the world as a geomatics engineer. His work has been diverse: infrastructure management & GIS in the Caribbean, geophysical research in Africa, deep sea salvage operations, First Nations land claim surveys in the Canadian North. Midway through this experience, John had the opportunity to work in the Yukon, and ever since he has made it his home.
John's educational background is in science and engineering. He also has lived and worked as an artist. Lately his focus has been with art based on salvaged and recycled materials. In his free time John likes to dance, fly kites and play trombone.
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JUSTIN P.J. TRUDEAU
Environmentalist, Educator

J. Trudeau © KatimavikThe education and empowerment of youth are priorities that have dominated Justin Trudeau's professional and personal life. Shortly after completing a B.A. in English Literature at McGill University, Justin moved to Vancouver to earn a B.Ed. from the University of British Columbia. For the next four years, Justin devoted himself to teaching children of all ages, in public and private schools, in a range of subjects, which included English, French, Creative Writing, Law and Math.

Justin has always loved the outdoors, working as a camp counsellor in Algonquin Park, a whitewater river guide on the Rouge River near Montreal, and a snowboard instructor at Whistler-Blackcomb. As a director of the Canadian Avalanche Foundation, he promotes intelligent risk-taking and awareness regarding wilderness safety and back-country adventuring.

Justin is the chair of Katimavik, our national youth service program, where he works to increase the engagement of Canada's youth with their country, their communities and their environment. He is also involved with Harvest Montreal, and wilderness groups such as the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society.

Justin Trudeau presently resides in Montreal, but his work with a large number of diverse organizations and levels of government keeps him travelling extensively to help ensure that Canada is prepared to meet the challenges and responsibilities its future holds.
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Dr. DON WALSH
Oceanographer

Dr. Walsh is an explorer, oceanographer and lecturer. Enlisting in the Navy in 1948, he graduated from Annapolis in 1954. During a 24 year naval career he spent 14 years at sea, mostly in submarines including command. At retirement he held the rank of Captain. Walsh's polar experience began with trips to the Arctic in 1955 and the Antarctic with the Navy's Deep Freeze '71 in 1971. He has worked at both North and South Poles and is eligible to wear the Antarctic Service Medal. The Walsh Spur (near Cape Hallett) was named for him in recognition of his contributions to the US Antarctic Research Program. Dr. Walsh may be best known for making oceanographic history in 1960 with Jacques Piccard when they dove 35,800 feet down in the Navy Bathyscaph Trieste to the bottom of the Marianas Trench, deepest place in the world ocean.For this historic descent, never duplicated since, Walsh was decorated by President Eisenhower at the White House. Author of over 150 articles and papers, he has been an advisor for the White House, NOAA and NASA. Dr. Walsh has a Bachelor's degree in Engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy, a Master's degree in Political Science from San Diego State University, and a Master's degree and a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from Texas A&M University. He was appointed by Presidents Carter and Reagan to the U.S. National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere, was a member of the Law of the Sea Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of State, and served as a member of the Marine Board of the U.S. National Research Council from 1990 to 1993. He is one of just 20 Honorary Life Members of the Explorer's Club and in 2001 received their highest award, The Explorer's Medal. Also in 2001, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of only 2,000 members to hold the top US honor for an engineer.
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SHEILA WATT-CLOUTIER
Chair, Inuit Circumpolar Conference

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is Chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference (ICC), the Inuit organization that represents the interests internationally of Inuit resident in Canada, Greenland, Alaska, and Chukotka in the Far East of the Federation of Russia. Currently living in Iqaluit, Nunavut, she was born in Kuujjuaq, Nunavik (northern Quebec), and was raised traditionally in her early years before attending school in southern Canada and in Churchill, Manitoba. 

Ms. Watt-Cloutier has an educational background in counselling, education, and human development. Her early experience as an Inuktitut interpreter for the Ungava Hospital in Nunavik led to a lifetime commitment toward improving health conditions and education in aboriginal communities. Dealing with youth issues holistically is important for Ms. Watt-Cloutier. She contributed significantly to "Silatunirmut: The Pathway to Wisdom," the 1992 report of the review of educational programming in Nunavik, and she co-wrote, produced and co-directed the acclaimed youth awareness video "Capturing Spirit: The Inuit Journey."

Ms. Watt-Cloutier has long been a political spokesperson for Inuit. From 1995 to 1998, she was Corporate Secretary of Makivik Corporation set-up under the 1975 James Bay and Northern Quebec Land Claims Agreement. She was elected President of ICC Canada in 1995 and re elected to this position in 1998, becoming international Chair of ICC in 2002. During her years at ICC Canada, Ms. Watt-Cloutier was spokesperson for a coalition of northern Indigenous Peoples that persuaded states to conclude a global agreement, signed in Stockholm in 2001, to ban the generation and use of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as DDT and PCBs, that contaminate the Arctic food web. She received the inaugural global environment award from the World Association of Non-Governmental Organizations in recognition for this work. She is also a recipient of the Aboriginal Achievement Award for Environment which she received in 2004.

Ms. Watt Cloutier is currently heavily engaged in climate change initiatives with the aim of persuading states to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases. She contributed markedly to ICC Canada's 1996-2000 Institution-Building Project for Northern Russian Indigenous Peoples' Project (INRIPP-1), and the ongoing, phase two of this project focussing on economic development and training in remote northern communities. She visited Chukotka in 2003 and announced a pilot project with the region's Indigenous Peoples to promote the marketing internationally of local arts and crafts.

Ms. Watt-Cloutier's vision for her term as Chair of ICC is to put the human/Inuit face on the global map. She feels, if citizens of the world can "connect" with the challenges the Arctic and it's people are facing, it will lead to better understanding of how the planet and it's people are one. Protect the Arctic-Save the Planet is one of her most common phrases as she delivers speeches throughout many parts of the world.

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Chelsea, Quebec CANADA


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